gettyimages:

The Rituals Of Ramadan - in Pictures

Getty Images photographer Dan Kitwood captures sights at an East London mosque during Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar - a time when Muslims around the world observe their faith by fasting from sunrise to sunset, abstain from impure thoughts, read the Koran, pray, and think of God.

Ramadan ends on July 29, making way for the Muslim holiday of Eid, which marks the end of 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting during the holy month.

Top & middle picture: A Muslim man reads the Koran while observing a spiritual seclusion called Itikaf at the East London Mosque on July 24, 2014 in London, England.

Bottom picture: Prayers are observed during Ramadan at the East London Mosque on July 24, 2014 in London, England.

All photos by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
(Editors note: pictures Image was created with an iPhone and processed using digital filters)

See more pictures from this series HERE

Innovation In Big Newsrooms

Kareem Amin, head of product at News Corp.:

“We don’t write text because its the best way to tell a story, we write text because it’s the easiest way to tell a story.”

Love this guy’s passion, dedication,how he turned it into a living and a way of life: Surf Photographer Clark Little.

nprbooks:

Hitch A Ride! We’ve Got Road Trip Reads For Every Passenger
Remember maps? A lot of these writers do. They use them to drive from Los Angeles to Las Vegas (Fear and Loathing), Tangier to Cape Town (Looking for Lovedu), and Xinjiang, China, to New Delhi (From Heaven Lake), among other places.
Photo credit: Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress

Screw the damn GPS.

nprbooks:

Hitch A Ride! We’ve Got Road Trip Reads For Every Passenger

Remember maps? A lot of these writers do. They use them to drive from Los Angeles to Las Vegas (Fear and Loathing), Tangier to Cape Town (Looking for Lovedu), and Xinjiang, China, to New Delhi (From Heaven Lake), among other places.

Photo credit: Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress

Screw the damn GPS.

German Non-Profit DataJ

“We are completely focused on data journalism,” David Schraven says of Correctiv. The team intends to compile and share large datasets that map people in power to the money behind them, collaborating with local open data organizations as well as other newsrooms.

sportbygettyimages:

By @robc71 “Do you ever get the feeling you’re being watched? World Cup photographers. #2014fifaworldcup #brazil #sport #iphone #insta #igers #travel #fifa14 #wanderings #worldcup #soccer #football #realfootball #copa2014 #photographer #myworldcup #brazil2014 #copa2014 #worldcup2014 #2014 #igworldclub #wm2014 #worldcupbrazil #daylife #maracana #photographers #cameragear #procamera #cameraporn #cameras #gettysport @gettysport”

There’s a unique angle or moment in there somewhere. I’m sure of it.

sportbygettyimages:

By @robc71 “Do you ever get the feeling you’re being watched? World Cup photographers. #2014fifaworldcup #brazil #sport #iphone #insta #igers #travel #fifa14 #wanderings #worldcup #soccer #football #realfootball #copa2014 #photographer #myworldcup #brazil2014 #copa2014 #worldcup2014 #2014 #igworldclub #wm2014 #worldcupbrazil #daylife #maracana #photographers #cameragear #procamera #cameraporn #cameras #gettysport @gettysport”

There’s a unique angle or moment in there somewhere. I’m sure of it.

(via gettyimages)

Data J School

Kathleen Bartzen Culver at MediaShift:

I have stopped using New York Times data visualizations in my training presentations to educators and students. Don’t get me wrong. They’re spectacular. This one setting winter Olympic event finishes to music completely changed my understanding of timed events. I learned about the nightmare of balancing the federal budget. And I figured out why World Cup soccer confuses me. But given my suspicion that far too few journalism programs are including data training across their curricula, most importantly at the entry level, I need to dial down the “wow.” Why show elite marathoners producing interactives like this (below) when I’m a toddler and my audience is just learning to crawl?

(Emphasis mine.)

Double Standard

Geof Dyer in The Guardian on what is perhaps Dennis Hopper’s most famous photograph:

So much photographic traffic converges here – Walker Evans, Frank, Friedlander, Stephen Shore – that if you had to distill 20th-century American photography into a single image you could do a lot worse than choose this one.

futurejournalismproject:

The News is Stressing Us Out
A new study suggests that following the news stresses Americans out.
The study, sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in partnership with the Harvard School of Public Health and National Public Radio, looks at stress in American lives and found that 25% of those polled said they experienced a “great deal” of stress in the previous month.
According to NPR, “[T]hese stressed-out people said one of the biggest contributors to their day-to-day stress was watching, reading or listening to the news.”
In an interview with NPR, Mary McNaughton-Cassill, a psychologist at the University of Texas at San Antonio, said one of the biggest stress drivers is sensationalist coverage of traumatic events, disturbing imagery used in such coverage and the endless looping of such imagery in newscasts.
You can read the study here and listen to an NPR segment on the study here.

futurejournalismproject:

The News is Stressing Us Out

A new study suggests that following the news stresses Americans out.

The study, sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in partnership with the Harvard School of Public Health and National Public Radio, looks at stress in American lives and found that 25% of those polled said they experienced a “great deal” of stress in the previous month.

According to NPR, “[T]hese stressed-out people said one of the biggest contributors to their day-to-day stress was watching, reading or listening to the news.”

In an interview with NPR, Mary McNaughton-Cassill, a psychologist at the University of Texas at San Antonio, said one of the biggest stress drivers is sensationalist coverage of traumatic events, disturbing imagery used in such coverage and the endless looping of such imagery in newscasts.

You can read the study here and listen to an NPR segment on the study here.

Where Is The Radio?

Steve Goldstein bought a new car. Then he woke up;

Well, I found the AM/FM. And here is the incredibly eye-opening news to me and should be to everyone in the radio business — we have been relegated to a second screen. One now has to click to find AM/FM. And to add insult to injury, AM/FM is no longer one of the physical buttons surrounding the screen.

He references this 2012 post by Eric Rhoads.

Swollen Streams

Via Quartz (ignore the Taylor Swift headline):

Yesterday Nielsen quietly released fresh figures on music sales, which showed further declines in digital downloads (down 12% over the past year) but huge gains for streaming services (up 42% over the same period).

Kurt Hanson has more on those numbers.

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